5 Minute Mondays

Why you MUST record each person on their own track

September 30, 2019
5 Minute Mondays
Why you MUST record each person on their own track
Chapters
5 Minute Mondays
Why you MUST record each person on their own track
Sep 30, 2019
Buzzsprout
Show Notes Transcript

In this episode, Travis explains why you absolutely must record each person to their own track (and how to do it).

Gear we recommend for multitrack recording:


Read our Podcast Accessories Guide to find even more options.

Disclosure: Some of these product links are affiliate links, which means Buzzsprout might receive a small commission if you decide to purchase them.

Remote recording solutions:


Read our Long-Distance Interview blog to learn which solution is best for you.

Fill out this short questionnaire to submit a question or topic for a future episode.

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Speaker 1:
0:00
Today on five minute Mondays, I'll explain why you absolutely must record each person to their own track.
Speaker 1:
0:09
Welcome to five minute Mondays where we bring you the best tips and strategies for building your podcast in five minutes or less. So if you're new here, consider subscribing. Now this week we are wrapping up our four-week minutes series focused on rookie editing mistakes. These are the common mistakes that you hear in new podcasts that detract from the listener experience and stunt your podcast growth. So if you're just now jumping into this mini series, make sure to go back and listen to all four episodes. Now today I'll explain why it's so important to record each person on their own microphone into their own audio track. Now, you might not think this is a big deal, but if you have ever tried to edit an interview or conversation with multiple people talking over and past each other, you know what a pain in the butt it is to try and take anything out.
Speaker 1:
0:59
Ideally, you want your listeners to not know where you've made your editing cuts. You want the pacing and the flow of the conversation to be so seamless that all of the editing you do becomes virtually invisible. Now, let's say for instance that your cohost had a coughing fit right in the middle of a story that you were telling. If you recorded each person onto a separate track, then all you have to do is delete or mute your cohost for that portion where they're coughing while your audio is unaffected. And so from the listener's perspective, it's as if that person wasn't coughing at all. If, however everything is mixed it down to a single track, you are left between leaving that coughing fit in or having to do some kind of audio gymnastics to edit around it, and that's just a huge pain in the butt.
Speaker 1:
1:50
You don't want it to have to deal with that. So here's what you need to do to record each person on their own track first. If you're recording multiple people in the same room, each person needs their own XLR microphone and then you'll need either a mixer or a USB interface, the oral record, each person's audio as a separate file. A couple mixers and USB interfaces that we recommend are the scarlet to ITU, which can handle two XLR inputs. The zoom h four n pro, which is a field recorder by zoom that can handle two XLR microphone inputs, the zoom h six which is very similar to the h four and pro but can handle four microphone inputs and then the road caster pro, which is a bells and whistles mixer that has everything you could ever need. That also has four microphone inputs. Now just be aware that many Behringer mixers, which are pretty popular in the podcasting space, only export audio to a mixdown stereo track.
Speaker 1:
2:52
Even if that mixer happens to have four microphone inputs. So make sure that your gear will let you record each person individually. Don't go out and buy a mixer that you're going to regret buying because you can't actually record everybody to a different track. But if you are doing your recording remote as in your cohost is in a different location, or if you're interviewing somebody that's not in the same room as you, then you can use one of our recommended recording software solutions and the three that we really liked that we recommend for doing remote podcast recording is zoom.us squad cast and Zencaster. Each of them have little quirks. Each of them have things to do really well and are known for, but all three of those solutions will record each person individually, which will give you the ultimate flexibility when you're editing your episode.
Speaker 1:
3:41
And then once you have each person's audio recorded and saved, all you have to do is simply create a track for each person in your editing software and then drag and drop each person's audio in to place. And now you've complete control over how your episode turns out. That's it for today. If you are new here, hit the subscribe button. If you're watching this on youtube or subscribed to the five minute Mondays podcast in your favorite app to squeeze even more podcast related content into your life. Now I left links in these show notes for our remote interview guide and our podcast accessories guide. If you want to do some more research and dig a little bit deeper into the accessories and the recording softwares that I mentioned in this episode, and if there's something that you want us to talk about on a future episode, please just click the link in the show notes and you can submit your question directly to me. Thanks for listening and as always, keep podcasting.
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